Joseph Hartung | Brewster Real Estate, Orleans Real Estate, Eastham Real Estate


The last thing you want to experience after purchasing a new home is "buyer's remorse!" With that in mind, it pays to look at all angles when house shopping. Although emotions and first impressions are going to play a big role in your home-buying decisions, a thoughtful analysis of the pros and cons of every home that appeals to you will help ensure you're making the best decision for you and your family.

While your real estate agent will help you find houses for sale that have the necessary number of bedrooms, bathrooms, and square footage, you'll need to make sure they're fully aware of your "wish list," your desired lifestyle, and your personal preferences. Here a few examples:

Commuting distance: Unless you've found your dream home that's absolutely perfect in every way (if such a thing exists), a long commute to work, every day, could dampen your enthusiasm about an otherwise great house. Since everyone has a difference tolerance for long commutes, there's no hard-and-fast rule for that facet of home buying. Having a comfortable vehicle, listening to books on tape, or streaming your favorite music or radio programs can help make a long commute more acceptable -- even enjoyable. If you take a train to work, every day, you also have the option of catching up on your reading, preparing for meetings, or even meditating. So while a long commute does not have to be a "deal breaker," it is an important factor worth pondering.

Privacy level: This is another aspect of home ownership that's based on personal preferences. However, if you realize -- after the fact -- that you don't have enough privacy from neighbors or passersby, then you might end up feeling less-than-satisfied with your new home. Fortunately, you can compensate for lack of privacy by installing fences or planting privacy hedges, but the best laid plans are generally formulated before you make a purchase offer. If you consider privacy to be a high priority, always take notice of a house's distance from neighbors and streets.

Leaky basements: Although there are solutions for wet basements, there's a lot of expense and inconvenience associated with having to implement them. Excessive moisture can not only damage stored furniture, books, and other belongings, but it's also a fertile breeding ground for mold and mildew. A qualified home inspector will generally point out issues like that, but it's much better to notice them before you get to that advanced stage in the home-buying process.

An experienced real estate agent who represents your interests can provide valuable guidance and help you notice potential "red flags" that could adversely affect your future enjoyment of a home. A buyers' agent can offer you the expertise, professional insights, and objective point of view you might not otherwise have.


This Land in Brewster, MA recently sold for $385,000. This style home was sold by Joseph Hartung - Gibson Sotheby's International Realty.


Brewster, MA 02631

Brewster (village)

Land

$385,000
Price
$385,000
Sale Price

Residential
PropertyType
Don't miss this incredible opportunity to purchase the largest parcel, 4.8 acres, of land currently for sale in Brewster. This land comes with Deeded Rights to Seymour Pond. Explore the possibilities of a family compound or farm.

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As a home seller, it is crucial to do whatever you can to optimize your house sale earnings. Lucky for you, we are here to help you promote your residence to the right groups of prospective buyers so you can increase the likelihood of a profitable home selling experience.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you maximize your home sale earnings.

1. Boost Your Home's Curb Appeal

You won't have to break your budget to upgrade your residence's curb appeal. In fact, completing simple home maintenance tasks like mowing the lawn and clearing dust and debris from exterior walkways may make it easy for buyers to fall in love with your residence.

Spend some time upgrading your residence's curb appeal – you'll be glad you did. Because if your home makes a positive first impression on buyers, there may be no shortage of interest in your house. As a result, buyers may compete for your home – something that could help you get the best price for your residence.

2. Remove Clutter

Clutter may make your home appear smaller than its true size. As such, you should do everything possible to eliminate clutter before you add your home to the real estate market.

Oftentimes, it helps to host a yard sale or list excess items online. In other instances, you may want to donate various items you no longer need to charity or give them to family members and friends.

For home sellers, it is essential to remove as much clutter as you can. Remember, if you eliminate clutter, you can showcase the true beauty of your residence's interior. This may help buyers see the full potential of your home, and ultimately, could lead to offers to purchase that match or exceed your expectations.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

If you are unsure about how to navigate different parts of the house selling process, there is no need to stress. By hiring a real estate agent, you can get the help you need to achieve the optimal home selling results.

A real estate agent is a house selling expert who will be able to provide you with personalized recommendations and suggestions. First, he or she will meet with you and learn about you and your home. A real estate agent next will craft a custom home selling strategy. And once a real estate agent puts your home selling plan into action, he or she will ensure you can enjoy a seamless home selling experience.

Furthermore, a real estate agent is available to assist you in any way possible. If you are unsure about how to price your residence, whether to accept an offer to purchase or have other home selling concerns, a real estate agent will help you address them immediately.

Ready to maximize your home sale earnings? Use the aforementioned tips, and you can bolster your chances of enjoying a success house selling experience.


This Land in Eastham, MA recently sold for $150,000. This style home was sold by Joseph Hartung - Gibson Sotheby's International Realty.


Eastham, MA 02642

Eastham (village)

Land

$150,000
Price
$150,000
Sale Price

Residential
PropertyType
Build your dream home in Eastham on this quiet yet conveniently located wooded lot. Located on the Bay side of town with proximity to the Windmill and First Encounter Beach. There is neighborhood access to Muddy Pond to enjoy kayaking and wildlife. Bring your builder and ideas to this two bedroom lot with a possible third if an alternative septic is installed.

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Household recycling has become easier than ever. Many towns and cities offer free recycling pickup, and even private waste management companies are implementing recycling programs.

There are a number of advantages to recycling. It helps protect the environment by reducing the amount of waste and making it easier to reuse raw materials. But, recycling is also advantageous to homeowners who don’t want to pay hefty fees for trash pickup when they can often recycle for free.

One of the more difficult aspects of household recycling is the learning curve of actually learning what is and isn’t recyclable. Homeowners might think something is recyclable because it’s made from plastic, only to find out later that it’s a specific type of plastic that can’t be recycled. On the other hand, you might be throwing some items in the garbage, filling up your bin each week when you could be recycling it instead.

In this article, we’re going to talk about some of the lesser known items you could be recycling. We’ll also cover some items you shouldn’t throw in your recycling bin, and give you tips on how to tell which is which.

Things that shouldn’t find their way into your recycling bin

It’s easy to assume that just because something looks like paper, plastic, or glass, that it can be tossed into your recycling bin. However, that isn’t always the case. Look out for these items that may not be recyclable in your area.

  • Used paper food containers. Pizza boxes are one of the biggest culprits that end up in recycling bins when they shouldn’t be. Items like paper food containers, use paper towels, and paper plates are all soiled with grease and other food residue making them ineligible for recycling.

  • Those glossy drink cartons made from unknown materials. There’s a good chance that if you can’t find a recycling logo on it somewhere it can’t be recycled. However, a growing number of cities are accepting milk cartons, so be sure to check on the rules in your area.

  • Plastic shopping bags. Those flimsy bags that you get from the supermarket? You can’t recycle those. As a result, many cities and stores are encouraging the use of reusable shopping bags. If you forget your bags at home, however, fear not: many supermarkets now accept your used plastic bags to be recirculated.

So that eliminates a lot of common household waste from being recycled. However, there are plenty of items you might not be aware of that can be tossed into the recycling bin.

Lesser known recyclable items around the house

Even if something isn’t eligible for curbside recycling doesn’t mean you should just toss it into the trash. There are many items that you can drop off or donate. Here are just a few items that are likely sitting in your house right now:

  • Old cell phones and electronics. Our gadgets are becoming obsolete at an ever-increasing rate. That means many of us have a lot of old tech junk sitting in boxes in our basements. The good news is that several stores accept free drop-offs of old electronics for reuse and recycling.

  • Mattresses and furniture. Large items like mattresses and old furniture are a pain to get rid of. They’re also likely useful to someone out there. For mattresses and box springs, try contacting retailers to see if they reuse them for materials. Furniture that is still in usable condition can be placed on Craigslist or donated to a thrift store like Goodwill or Salvation Army.

  • Oil and ink. Run out of ink in your printer? Online retailers will often pay you for your old cartridges. Also, if you recently changed your oil, drop it off at an auto parts store to be recycling into other automotive materials.




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